‘Smash’ Stars An ‘Interesting Tribe’: Theater People

NPR: All Things Considered | January 28, 2012

NBC’s new drama Smash plumbs the drama behind the curtain. The series is the story of a Broadway musical — from the first idea to auditions, rehearsals and the big premiere. Theresa Rebeck is the show’s creator and executive producer. She’s also a screenwriter, playwright and a Broadway veteran — with a hit play, Seminar, that’s now on Broadway. Rebeck tells Weekend Edition host Scott Simon that Smash is a “workplace drama — it’s just that the workplace is a musical.” Read More…


Theresa Rebeck Talks about Making a Living as an Artist

NPR: All Things Considered | July 14, 2009

When Theresa Rebeck moved to New York to pursue her dream as a playwright, she did what a lot of starving artists do: She temped. Meanwhile, she helped personally subsidize her work in funky little off-off-Broadway theaters. Read More…


The 5 Minute Interview: Theresa Rebeck

The Independent | April 22, 2008

Rebeck has written scripts for ‘LA Law’ and ‘NYPD Blue’, picking up many awards for stage and screen work. Her latest novel, ‘Three Girls and Their Brother’, is out this month. If I weren’t talking to you right now I’d be… Writing. Read More…


Theresa Rebeck and Bobby Cannavale on Mauritius

The Leonard Lopate Show, WNYC | November 8, 2007

The new Broadway play Mauritius, now at the Biltmore Theater, was described by the New York Times as a “thriller about stamp collecting.” Leonard talks to playwright Theresa Rebeck and star Bobby Cannavale. Read More…


Reflections of an Impatient Person

Houston Chronicle | October 26, 2007

“I’m an impatient person,” playwright Theresa Rebeck says. “I work hard. I like getting to the end of things. And I write my plays that way. I’m not afraid of just cranking it out and seeing what comes out of my subconscious. Because I don’t always know what I’m feeling. I do a lot of rewriting later. But that first blast feels like a spigot — like it’s coming from somewhere else.” Read More…


An Acute Interest in Bad Behavior

NY Times | September 23, 2007

Betrayal and treason and poor behavior. A lot of poor behavior. The playwright Theresa Rebeck is ticking off the common themes that unite her plays, which on the surface can seem quite unlike one another. Whatever the script — be it a comic solo show about one woman’s romantic tribulations (“Bad Dates”), an expressionistic dinner party held at the edge of Hades (“Omnium Gatherum,” which she wrote with Alexandra Gersten-Vassilaros) or a cutting satire about status in the empty world of show business society (“The Scene”) — a lot of bad manners are on display in Ms. Rebeck’s dramatic universe. Read More…


Neophytes Twixt Twain and Mamet

NY Times | September 9, 2007

ONE of the oft-heard knocks on Broadway is the absence of new plays, or at least the absence of new plays not written by British guys and previously raved about in London. The fall season features one of these, natch: the much-anticipated “Rock ’n’ Roll” by Tom Stoppard. But it is also unusually — almost unfathomably — rich in new plays by American writers. The assortment of authors represented includes the celebrated David Mamet, the celebrated-in- another-medium Aaron Sorkin and the celebrated-but-dead Mark Twain, along with two talented playwrights new to Broadway, Theresa Rebeck and Tracy Letts. Read More…


Heaton, Shalhoub Fire Up Caustic Domestic Comedy

Bloomberg | January 12, 2007

On the surface, it may appear to be just a bubbly boulevard comedy. And, on the surface, that’s what Theresa Rebeck’s “The Scene” uproariously is. But underneath lurks something much darker, almost tragic. That is how great, double-bottomed comedies are: Think “The Misanthrope,” think “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Read More…


Theresa Rebeck

Bomb Magazine | Fall 2006

I met Theresa Rebeck several years ago, when I invited her to speak to a class I was teaching at Columbia on the work of a new generation of playwrights. They included Tony Kushner, Kenneth Lonergan, Jon Robin Baitz, Peter Parnell, Frank Pugliese, Alan Ball, and Rebeck. These playwrights were also invigorating the writing of the independent film movement and television, and Rebeck was one of the first playwrights to move easily among these three forms of dramatic storytelling. After earlier plays like Spike Heels and Sunday on the Rocks, Rebeck wrote a series of scripts, for films including Harriet the Spy and Gossip and for such television series as NYPD Blue, Law and Order: Criminal Intent, and The Webster Report. Her recent play Omnium Gatherum (written with Alex Gersten) was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and Bad Dates has been produced all over the country. Read More…


A Date with Theresa Rebeck

American Theatre | October 2005

MWF, early forties, settled, accomplished, witty, professionally versatile. Strong views on contemporary social and political mores. Loves Dickens, the Red Sox. Dog person. Seeks creative adventures. Send self-analysis, no calls, please. You might expect a date with Theresa Rebeck—judging from her wildly popular solo play Bad Dates—to be an awkward business. Read More…


A Chat with Theresa Rebeck

Playbill.com | January 18, 2004

Since Theresa Rebeck, who’s had much success writing for TV, recently had two plays—Omnium Gatherum (written with Alexandra Gersten-Vassilaros) and Bad Dates—on New York stages, would that indicate a return to her first love? “I never stopped doing theatre,” insists Rebeck. “It’s interesting. I think people think you have to concentrate on one or the other. Right now, I have stopped doing television. It’s what I’ve done to support myself and my family. I just got tired of it.” Read More…